Posts Tagged ‘baby’

Darling Alpacas–Crias are Here

June 15, 2010

What would make a person who likes to travel, who has trouble sitting in one spot, who seldom worries about much, who likes to sleep in get up at 6 a.m.,  and spend three weeks waiting and watching anxiously?

Spring crias. Finally they are here and I am once again breathing deeply and relaxing.

They are wonderful and their mothers have everything under control with little or no help from us. Two were born at Fox Run Suri Alpacas. Those were the easiest since Carla and Don Llewellyn did the watching and waiting and delivering like the experienced alpaca people they are. Carla was here for our first delivery at our ranch here in Zena, Oklahoma, and all Tom and I had to do with the last two was watch in amazement.

More details about our darlings is coming soon, but here are the photos–one birth to go.

Zena's Peruvian Accoyo Topaz

Zena's Peruvian Cullinan

Zena's Peruvian Stage Door Johnny

Zena's Peruvian ZephyrZena's Peruvian Cassandra still wet, but on the ground three weeks late

Zena's Peruvian Cassandra

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May 7, 2010
The Cria Demand Their Grain

The Cria Demand Their Grain

We are working, trying to get our ranch set up for our June 10 Grand Opening. The Grove Chamber of Commerce will host a ribbon cutting ceremony at 11 a.m. and we will be officially classified as one of Grand Lake’s official attractions. There are not the same event, but both are part of the promotion of an alpaca ranch. We plan to have a little shop with fleece, yarn, alpaca bears, and finished alpaca products. Whew! So much to do. Eventually we hope that most of the things we sell will be made from our our renewable alpaca fiber. We are biting purposely biting off more than we can chew, I think–but watch us grow.

Here Kitty, Kitty–waiting for Godot Alpaca

May 2, 2010

April 14 came and went. It’s been blustery, cold, and snowy up in Utah and Kaatakilla (named for the Incan moon goddess) was just not ready. We are still awaiting the birth of her full-Accoyo suri cria. Every day I think to myself, “O. K., today’s the day.” Now it is May 2 and still nothing. The little entity moves around and kicks poor Kat from the inside but refuses to arrive no matter how hard we wait and we still don’t know what color the nursery should be.

April in Utah this year seems to have meant no spring at all. Our house is still on the market and we are trying to decide if a new realtor is the answer or if the one-two punch of bad economy and nasty weather is somehow not his fault. Spring is here in Oklahoma, but not in Utah.

I hear that alpacas can “hold off” a pregnancy and I think I’m believing that’s true about now. Please Kat, one healthy, beautiful cria at your earliest convenience–a boy or girl would be just fine.

Oh, and for those of you who thought this blog would be about cats, here’s Bristol…

Bristol samples alpaca drinking water. Is it better than cat water?

Bristol samples alpaca drinking water. Is it better than cat drinking water?

Alpaca Sadness

April 30, 2010

A lot has happened since I last took blog in hand. We experienced one of the most horrific shearings I’ve ever heard of with shearers arriving after 9 p.m. It lasted until one-thirty a.m. and, sadly, three days later he had a still birth. While I might have blamed the shearers, given the events of that day, it was probably a blessing in disguise. The poor little one was an abomination far smaller than it should have been with sad little white glazed malformed eyes and a cleft palate.

Perhaps we should try to hide that the sad little creature was born and pretend it never happened, but even these small mistakes are a piece of the fabric of life.

I noticed that Jesse was missing from our daily grain feast and saw her alone, out in the field and my heart instantly knew something was wrong. She lay there three feet from her newborn cria, confused. She had never delivered a baby. It didn’t move, had never moved and would never move and she couldn’t leave it. I had been told by a friend not to suddenly remove a cria in this circumstance and stood back a bit waiting and uncertain of just what to do.

After a bit, two of the other girls, Laguna and Tika, came for her. In its own way, it was a beautiful thing. Jesse slowly got up and they escorted her quietly to the barn, one on either side. She did not look back. I quietly and respectfully removed the little creature from the rise in the field where it had been born. We buried it with its head facing west since the Indians say it is better when the Great Spirit comes for it. It was a very sad, yet awe-inspiring day.

Alpaca #5, Cavatina–she’s not mine, you know :-)

August 24, 2009

When we first purchased three alpacas, I had to make a solemn promise. I wouldn’t ask for any more alpacas for a year. Having a fourth born within days of our purchase was astonishing. The little black beauty, Demelza whetted my appetite and any woman who has and enjoys having a baby around knows that it makes you want to keep a little one around.

I really did intend to keep my promise–really. But Madrigal, our third alpaca’s mother had the most darling cria, Cavatina. One of my girls had a half Accoyo, half sister and I wanted her so much. Hmmm. I had been really good between July and November. OK, I wanted Cavatina and had to figure out how to add her to our herd. When I came to visit, she would break away and come running over to see me. So darling, so many alpaca kisses. Hmmm.

I confess. I gave her to my husband for Christmas.