Posts Tagged ‘Zena Suri Alpacas’

Prep for Shearing Alpacas

April 5, 2011

If I had time I would be looking for my photo cord, but the truth is I just don’t. The alpacas are happily letting themselves in and out of the barn in the morning, but the boys didn’t want to stay out or use their three-sided shed last night, so today I had to do door duty for them. Last night was freezing cold but it is 10-15 degrees warmer in the barn this time of year and there is no wind chill. Yesterday we had gusts up to 40 mph but in the afternoon the wind stopped.

Tom and I were watching the news and I said, “What was that?” What it was, was no wind. It’s slated to start again later today. No matter really. The alpacas only mind it when it is cold and when it is warm the suri fleece lifts and they are air-conditioned. We should hit the sunny mid-60s later. The grass has greened up very nicely and with any luck we will get to open the new field this afternoon. They will have access to one of our little half-way house barns as well as the main barn for wind protection and shade and the new field has something else they have not been able to get near–up to this point: It has trees.

Oh, I almost forgot about the shearing in the title. We shear on Friday–how did I ever wind up with shearing on a Friday??? I think this means I have no helpers at all. I hope the shearer brings help. I am trying to concentrate on getting bags and labels and the CDT shots about half of the herd needs ready. We will also give vitamins and weigh both alpaca and fleece I am nervous. Last year’s shearers weren’t so wonderful. Read down in my blog history if you want to know how awful it was.

I feel as though I am going in for a new hairdo myself. I wonder if the shearer does people too. If he does a good job, I’ll ask. Oh, and if you’re in the vicinity come on by and I’ll put you to work.

Darling Alpacas–Crias are Here

June 15, 2010

What would make a person who likes to travel, who has trouble sitting in one spot, who seldom worries about much, who likes to sleep in get up at 6 a.m.,  and spend three weeks waiting and watching anxiously?

Spring crias. Finally they are here and I am once again breathing deeply and relaxing.

They are wonderful and their mothers have everything under control with little or no help from us. Two were born at Fox Run Suri Alpacas. Those were the easiest since Carla and Don Llewellyn did the watching and waiting and delivering like the experienced alpaca people they are. Carla was here for our first delivery at our ranch here in Zena, Oklahoma, and all Tom and I had to do with the last two was watch in amazement.

More details about our darlings is coming soon, but here are the photos–one birth to go.

Zena's Peruvian Accoyo Topaz

Zena's Peruvian Cullinan

Zena's Peruvian Stage Door Johnny

Zena's Peruvian ZephyrZena's Peruvian Cassandra still wet, but on the ground three weeks late

Zena's Peruvian Cassandra

Advertising Alpacas

May 7, 2010
The Cria Demand Their Grain

The Cria Demand Their Grain

We are working, trying to get our ranch set up for our June 10 Grand Opening. The Grove Chamber of Commerce will host a ribbon cutting ceremony at 11 a.m. and we will be officially classified as one of Grand Lake’s official attractions. There are not the same event, but both are part of the promotion of an alpaca ranch. We plan to have a little shop with fleece, yarn, alpaca bears, and finished alpaca products. Whew! So much to do. Eventually we hope that most of the things we sell will be made from our our renewable alpaca fiber. We are biting purposely biting off more than we can chew, I think–but watch us grow.

Alpaca Blog Update–About Comments on “Alpaca Sadness”

May 3, 2010

Thank you to everyone who took a peek and maybe shed a tear yesterday. 111 people clicked on “Alpaca Sadness” and made it the most read blog I have written by far. After sharing it, I felt reconnected with all that is good about people.

Several people commented, saying things that had never occurred to me as I wrote. “It is about the strength of mother love and appropriate that it was written just a bit before Mother’s Day.” Jesse would not leave her cria. She had carried it for ten months and she knew it was hers, alive or dead, for better or worse, forever, eventually she went on without it because there was nothing else she could do.

“It is about friendship and how girlfriends stick with you.” Thanks to Laguna and Tika. You go girls. When I watch the alpacas out in the fields, it is as though they were joined by some kind of invisible floss. They move in groups like ladies going to the powder room (or to the poop pile), hum to each other, watch out for each other, comfort one another. I guess friends are good no matter what your species. I am delighted to see that my beloved alpacas care about each other. For additional information on this, read my earlier blog about alpaca family groups.

“It’s life and death.” What can I say to expand on that? Life on a ranch is all about life and death and a connection to land, earth and sky and water and weather. It feels good to be here with the gentle, sweet alpacas. Even in sorrow we are truly blessed. As someone told me, it’s important to not pretend that there is never a tragedy and that bad things never happen. Life continues and is affirmed. We are expecting more 16 babies this year. I hope they are all strong and healthy. We will never forget that one.

Thanks to everyone. I’m working on a giveaway for my followers. Fleece, yarn, clothing? Something alpaca. We’d like to share our bounty with you. Watch this space.

Here Kitty, Kitty–waiting for Godot Alpaca

May 2, 2010

April 14 came and went. It’s been blustery, cold, and snowy up in Utah and Kaatakilla (named for the Incan moon goddess) was just not ready. We are still awaiting the birth of her full-Accoyo suri cria. Every day I think to myself, “O. K., today’s the day.” Now it is May 2 and still nothing. The little entity moves around and kicks poor Kat from the inside but refuses to arrive no matter how hard we wait and we still don’t know what color the nursery should be.

April in Utah this year seems to have meant no spring at all. Our house is still on the market and we are trying to decide if a new realtor is the answer or if the one-two punch of bad economy and nasty weather is somehow not his fault. Spring is here in Oklahoma, but not in Utah.

I hear that alpacas can “hold off” a pregnancy and I think I’m believing that’s true about now. Please Kat, one healthy, beautiful cria at your earliest convenience–a boy or girl would be just fine.

Oh, and for those of you who thought this blog would be about cats, here’s Bristol…

Bristol samples alpaca drinking water. Is it better than cat water?

Bristol samples alpaca drinking water. Is it better than cat drinking water?

Alpacas and the Business of Spring

April 7, 2010

Whoa! Time slips by quickly, doesn’t it? Saturday is our first shearing here at Zena. Spring=nude alpacas. There is some lovely fleece out there in the fields that I can’t wait to get my hands on–unfortunately there is a lot of hay in it and picking it out at this point seems to do little good since it magically reappears overnight.

The little ones are pretty much weaned and partly/mostly halter trained just in time for the business in store for us. Saturday is our big shearing day! I almost messed us up good and didn’t find a shearer to come. I had plenty of time and then I suddenly had no time. Fortunately we have been fit into a schedule. Shearing will happen in the evening on what should be a beautiful Saturday–or the crew may wait and do the deed early Monday morning. We are providing a place to sleep and a nice bathroom with shower.  🙂 The crew does not work on Sundays so we will be playing everything by ear.

I have been invited to speak about alpacas to a local woman’s club and we have had our first ranch visitors. We plan to be open for visitors several times a week–this is a big summer tourist area. The local Chamber of Commerce has announced that we are one of the area’s attractions and we had to put up a gate (before we even talked to the chamber) because we were having so many unannounced visitors. And here we thought we were so out of the way no one would ever come. Now we have to announce hours and everything. Come and visit if you’re out our way, far Northeastern Oklahoma–less than 25 miles to Kansas, Missouri or Arkansas.

There will be a grand opening for our business in June and by then, hopefully our shop will be in place. I owe all of you photos–now all I have to do is find my camera. So much to do!

Our first visitors came with their grandparents on a rainy, cold April day. Luckily we have a big barn and a heated office. The boys came to check them out and appointed Marti as their official spokes-alpaca. We will have another group of alpacas coming in June and have half a dozen babies (cria) due this spring.

Please call 804-389-2579 or email zenasurialpacas@gmail.com for information about tours, purchasing alpacas, alpaca products or agisting (boarding) alpacas.

Another Dozen Alpacas

March 16, 2010

Sunday meant another dozen alpacas. Can you believe it? Friday we had our first ranch visitors, a lovely couple who brought their grandchildren and compared our house and property to a place they’d been in New Zealand–the green rolling meadows and the porches all around the house, I think, rather than Jay or Grove.

The dozen alpacas hit the ground and never looked back. Utah? Um, hmmm. I think I may have been there once.

This morning the girls headed for the field with wild ecstasy, like they were “strung together,” Tom said, wildly flinging themselves into the field with abandon. Go babies! If joy could be bottled, this was the place to bottle it!

It is wonderful to see them interacting as a herd and the first group did this to a degree, but this seems to be multiplied many times over with the arrival of the second group. I talked about family groups before and, for some of the alpacas this seems very important. Divinity, who is still nursing Zeke, sleeps with him and her daughter from the previous year, Demelza. Divinity’s mother Mindy May is here with her son Cruz. Mindy is our oldest girl and Cruz is currently the youngest.

Sonnet is here with her son SkyKing, but her daughters Madrigal and Cavatina are still in Utah. Since they are maidens, our mentor kept them in case they need assistance and so they can be rebred. I feel badly about this now because Sonnet seems to be looking for them.

While Tevilla’s mother, Dynasti is here, Tevilla appears to be on her own and chooses to spend time with Demelza during the day.

Tevilla, at the alert

Carmel Sundae has two of her three children here. Her son Agassi, the most recent, is in Utah and will be shown this spring. While Fantine and Shira are here, this family group seems to be simply three adults.

One or two alpacas seem to be appointed to watch while the rest eat peacefully. Rhapsody notices a lot even though she is not one of the primary lookouts. When she is in the paddock and we are looking out the windows, she watches us right back. So I guess she watches us watching her watching us…

The boys had one new addition, Ozzy, a gelding. Cantu and Marti, below, express their opinions at his arrival. Everyone, boys and girls, seems to be adjusting fairly well.

So how was your day?

Alpacas and Spot Meet

February 28, 2010

Ever since Spot met chickens and I had to sprint madly across the parking lot at Fox Run Suri Alpacas and into the barn to save one he suddenly had his eye (and just before I grabbed him) his mouth on, I’ve been more than a little nervous about him and the alpacas. True, he didn’t actually injure it. However had I been a nanosecond later, I cannot vouch for his character.

Since then we have dealt with him and my friend Patti’s guinea hens–and he has learned that just because it runs, it doesn’t mean it should be chased–a difficult lesson for a breed (cocker spaniel) that is supposed to flush and fetch birds.

Today, we decided that Spot could not avoid alpacas through all eternity.

The boys want to know what “that thing” is, but there is no panic, only curiosity. Spot held his ground and accepted all of the sniffs offered without offering any hostility. Spot, asked to sit and stay, did except when he collapsed into a heap and just let them check him out. Yay Spot! You are the dog we hoped you would be around alpacas.

So Spot got up and quietly walked away while Allegiance and Cantu watched. Good dog Spot.

Alpacas LOVE Oklahoma

February 27, 2010

Great news! The camera cord has been found and the first shipment of alpacas has been here in Zena for a week. We have opened a pasture for the girls and another for the boys. It is truly a joy watching them run.

Allegiance, our award-winning, mostly accoyo, suri herdsire and alpha male truly enjoys the new field as he leads the way. Marti (white) and Cantu (brown) follow. Allegiance brings together the Starbuck and Bruxo/Macgyver lines. Mom is the beautiful Cassini.

Martillo (Marti) brings together the Torbio and Brigadier/Sergeant Major Jax lines and his mom is our true black beauty Laguna.

Cantu is a Macgyver grandson, son of Fox Run’s Peruvian Nomar and Peruvian Mindy May whose offspring include champions in every generation.

Breeding to our boys begin this year and we’re breeding for the best fleece AND conformation.

OK, since you’ve stuck with me this far, you get another photo.

The girls and cria Zeke get last minute instructions from Don Llewellyn of Fox Run Suri Alpacas who transported them from Utah to Oklahoma and Tom before being released to pursue their own interests. Pay attention Jesse, there will be a quiz.